Sarlat, France is a fabulous historical travel destination. What can you see in Sarlat and Dordogne area? Found where the Ceou River flows into the Dordogne, Castelnaud-la-Chapelle is a dominant fortress dating to the 1200s. During the Hundred Years’ War in the 1300s and 1400s it was allied to the English Plantagenets and faced off against the Chateau de Beynac, just across the Dore and controlled by the French. It’s recognised as a French Historical Monument for its gatehouse, keep and curtain walls woven with loopholes, all soaring over the river. You can come for a 45-minute tour in English or French, see a large exhibit of historic weaponry, as well as working replicas of the powerful siege engines used in the Hundred Years’ War.

Place des Oies is where you can see the life-size bronze statue of three geese that seems to appear on every postcard of Sarlat; birds that have served as a delicacy for many Salardais over the centuries. Meanwhile, on Place de la Liberte, many visitors might experience a feeling of deja vu, as this iconic square has often served as a backdrop for films.

La Roque-Gageac: Part of the Dordogne’s spell is its drop-dead gorgeous villages, as this waterfront huddle of medieval stone on the Dordogne River testifies. The sheer golden cliffs sheltering a 12th-century troglodyte fort are awe-inspiring. Down on the river, traditional gabarres (barges), used to transport barrels of wine and salt downstream in the 19th century, plough the water. Hop aboard! Or gorge on bird’s eye views of the village and its grey, lauze-tiled rooftops from a hot-air balloon; Montgolfiere du Perigord (montgolfiere-du-perigord.com), a mile up the road, arranges flights.

Searching for hotel rooms in Sarlat France? The place de la Liberte is the epicenter of the town, which is also where the weekly farmer’s market is held and where the many regional specialties are offered for sale: black truffles, the world famous “foie gras” (duck liver pate), figs, nuts and more. Many movies and television series have been filmed in Sarlat as the town features one of the most pristine medieval architectural heritage in the world. Expatriates from around the world flock to this medieval jewel of a city, in the search of sunlight, culture, food and overall lifestyle. The proximity of the Dordogne River, along with its many outdoor activities (canoeing, rafting, fishing, biking, hiking, etc) is a huge draw for people of all ages and from all walks of life. You’ll therefore routinely hear English, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, German and of course French, spoken in the streets of Sarlat as well as in the surrounding towns and villages of Carsac, Cenac, La Roque Gageac, Beynac, etc. Read more details at Sarlat-la-Caneda accommodations.

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