Incredible Turkey … the location at the center between East and West influences. With its knobbly-topped rock cliffs speckled with cave dwellings, walking through Zelve Open-Air Museum is an experience of the Cappadocia of old. The settlement began life as a monastery in the 9th century, and by the 20th century was a thriving village. Due to erosion and rockfall dangers, the village had to be abandoned in 1952. Now the entire valley is a museum. There are a couple of interesting chapels to see — the Uzumlu Kilise (Grape Church) being the most intact — and a rather picturesque rock-cut mosque. But the real joy of this site is meandering down the cliffside paths, exploring the fire-blackened interiors of the cave dwellings, and staring out at the magnificent vistas over the surrounding countryside.

Nemrut is a 2,134 meter (7,001 ft) high mountain in southeastern Turkey, near the city of Adiyaman. In 62 BC, King Antiochus I Theos of Commagene built a tomb-sanctuary flanked by huge statues of himself, two lions, two eagles and various Greek, and Persian gods on the mountain top. Since their construction, the heads have toppled from the bodies and lay scattered throughout the site. The summit of Mount Nemrut provides a great view of the surrounding mountains. The main attraction is to watch the sunrise from the eastern terrace which give the bodyless heads a beautiful orange hue and adds to the sense of mystery of the place.

The surreal swooping rock valleys of Cappadocia are every photographer’s dream. Cliff ridges and hill crests are home to rippling panoramas of wave-like rock or wacky-shaped pinnacles that have been formed by millennia of wind and water action. And if you don’t feel like hiking for the views, this is one of the world’s top destinations to take a hot air balloon ride. If the lunarscape isn’t enough to tempt you, nestled in these valleys are the frescoed rock-cut churches of the Byzantine Era, when this area was an important early Christian site.

The Gallipoli Campaign in World War One saw months of bitter fighting between Allied troops – particularly those of Australia and New Zealand – and the forces of the Ottoman Empire. It was an attempt by the Allies to knock the Ottomans out of the war and its failure marked a high-point for Ottoman forces during the conflict. In modern times, the battlefields of this campaign are marked with a series of memorials, museums and cemeteries where visitors can pay their respects and learn about the sombre history of these costly events. Today, it is at Anzac Cove where the annual commemorative Anzac Day ceremonies are held.

The early Christians that fled Roman persecution fled to this area and found refuge in the caves that you can see and explore on a best Cappadocia tours. They also made outhouses, stables, storage and workrooms. There is an excellent hiking potential in Cappadocia with rigid valleys and lots of history that are all great to see when on a Cappadocia full day tour that will intrigue all visitors to Cappadocia. See all these amazing sights and learn all about the history on tours of Cappadocia. More details about Cappadocia hot air balloon ride.

The Chora Church may be a little bit off the beaten tourist path, but visitors say the beautiful Byzantine art is well worth the effort to get there. Magnificent mosaics and frescoes depict the life of Jesus and his mother, Mary. Known as the Church of the Holy Savior in Chora, it has been described as one of the most beautiful surviving works of Byzantine architecture. Dating back to the days of Constantine, the Chora was a monastery in its early years; a few centuries later, it became a mosque, and in 1948, it was converted to a museum.

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