Road Van (RV) life is fabulous. Fun, travel, freedom combined in one lifestyle. But there are many aspects that can be optimized, to make your RV life even cheaper. RV parking tips : Some folks drive their RVs solo, and although I can’t say much about hitching and unhitching a motorhome and car combo, our good friend Bob has found a great way to hitch and unhitch a fifth wheel trailer solo. He marked the front landing leg that’s near the extend/retract button at regular intervals all the way up and down the leg. Hash marks on a landing leg help get the rig back to the right height before hitching up. Then he numbered each hash mark. He keeps a pad and pen in the hatch near the landing legs button. When unhitching, once he’s raised the trailer to where he can drive the truck out from under it, he jots down the hash mark number that is visible on the leg. Then he drives out, parks, and returns to the trailer and raises or lowers the landing legs as necessary to get the trailer level.

Schedule Time Daily for Decluttering and Simplifying. Even an hour a day will, day after day, make a big difference. Focus on One Small Area at a Time. For example, one drawer, one shelf, or one wall of your closet. Keeping your focus on one small area at a time will help prevent you from feeling overwhelmed. Small areas also make it easier to see progress, which is important for staying motivated. Make a Decision. Every time you pick something up, whether it’s a piece of china or a piece of paper, make a decision about it: keep, donate, or pitch. Don’t lay it down to think about later. Always make a decision.

The key to our survival is good communication. There is limited room in an RV and it will start to feel small fast. If you’re frustrated or angry with each other, that space will feel even smaller. Sure you can take a walk, sit outside for a while or jump in the car (if you tow one) and go for a drive, but temporary distance won’t solve the issues. A lack of communication in the first month of transitioning to RV living put stress on our relationship. Once we figured out the communication breakdown and addressed it, life was much more enjoyable. Good communication is something we continue to work on everyday especially living full time in a camper van.

Short road van pick of the month : I’ve been looking at the Vistas for a while to upgrade my class C RV. I have seen all their different layouts and the model 27P is the shortest. What I don’t like about it that the interior design is still dated for my taste. Many RV manufacturer now are upgrading to a more modern look, but not the Vista. However, Vista is still cheaper than other Class A RVs in this category. See more info on supporting your RV lifestyle.

RV security system pick : Reolink Argus Wireless Motorhome Security Camera: While the first two products for RV security are alarm systems, this is a security camera. The good thing is that it is wireless and powered by standard lithium batteries. This means you will not have wires flying all around. Plus, it doesn’t matter if there is a power problem; your RV is still protected. Also, the batteries can last for about 180 days without replacement. That is 6 months of effective HD camera performance for your RV’s protection.

Before you start asking where you will get money from, you need to know the cost of being a full-time RVer. There is no specific cost for living in your RV full-time. However, the cost can be roughly around $1000-$3000 a month, but your expenses can make the figures go higher or lower. One major cost is if you will live in private parks or camp for free on public land. You can know your total costs when you make a budget. It is especially the case if you have a family or pets or both. Source: https://smallrvlifestyle.com

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