San Blas sailing and winter 2020 deals! San Blas adventure travel locations are a fabulous thing right now. If you’re doing a budget stay on an island, you need to take your own water. They recommend one gallon per person per day. You can buy water on some islands but it’s $5 for a small bottle and they do run out. Best to bring your own. You can also bring snacks because it’s an all-inclusive situation here and seafood and rice isn’t always that filling. We took granola bars and other filling snacks. Other than food, here are some things that you’ll want to bring to San Blas in your day-pack, keep in mind you’ll basically live in your swimsuit.

Our last stop, an island famous among sailors who know the best kept secrets in San Blas, gives you more time to swim in the beautiful calm waters. With two islands right next to each other and home to a big shipwreck, stranded on its outer reef, you can enjoy the pristine beaches and beautiful scenery. Between 3-4pm we will leave this island paradise and head back to the Port of Carti. Your driver will be waiting for you and safely drive you back to Panama City, dropping you off at your lodging by 7pm. San Blas is one of the last unspoiled and undeveloped places in the world and we hope you will get to experience the beauty of the islands and the innocence of the unique Kuna culture. For our guests who only have one day to travel to the “Guna Yala” nation, the San Blas Day tour is the best option and will surely make you want to come back again.

The San Blas islands and Guna Indians have been the subject of numerous National Geographic articles. Indeed your experience will be right out of the pages of National Geographic. They offer two unbeatable attractions: Caribbean islands of stunning pristine beauty and an opportunity to visit the Guna people, a living Indian culture with a fascinating culture and way of life. In 2011 Lonely Planet selected San Blas as the #3 tropical paradise in the world: “Look up ‘tropical paradise’ and there will probably be a picture of the Guna Yala archipelago. These small islands (also known as the San Blas Islands) are part of the semi-autonomous territory of the Guna people with are part of the semi-autonomous territory of the Guna people and feature palm trees, gorgeous beaches, thatched huts and timeless charm. Big business hasn’t gained a foothold because the Guna rule the roost, with a series of laws to preserve the natural environment. So no ugly hotels spoiling the view and no package tourism polluting the vibe, just plenty of uninhabited islands to explore.” See more details on San Blas day tour.

The 360 or so tropical islands off Panama’s northern coast are home to the Kuna people, who since a revolution against the Panamanian government in 1925 have maintained political autonomy from the mainland. As such, they control tourism on their own terms – a very rare thing for an indigenous group. They know how many visitors are coming to their islands on a given day, where they will be staying, and they benefit directly from most of the tourist dollars spent. Aside from fuel for their motorboats, much of it goes on education, health or permaculture.

Few attractions include The Amador Causeway connects the three islands by the entrance to the Panama Canal to the mainland. From the causeway, there is a terrific view of Panama City, and the Bridge of the Americas. Many Panamanians like to spend their weekends jogging, riding a bicycle or rollerblading down the causeway, or having a meal or drinks in one of the many restaurants and bars on the islands.

In this place the first Spanish settlement in the area was built in the early seventeenth century and was also where San Blas was founded. On the San Basilio Hill the most important Colonial Ruins on the Pacific Coast are found. The old fort of San Blas also known as La Contaduria (now semi-restored) and the Church of Our Lady of the Rosary «La Marinera» dating from 1769, where you can find the famous bronze bells immortalized by Henry W. Longfellow in his posthumous poem «The Bells of San Blas.» These Colonial ruins are not restored but well worth visiting… The church is beautiful and gives us a clear idea of the Spanish community that settled in San Blas in those days.

One of the very few places in Panama where you can watch the sun set over the Pacific Ocean, the Sunset Coast is an undiscovered area with small towns, wide open beaches, and a small number of lodges where you can get away from the tourist scene. This is rural Panama, home to rolling hills, small villages, family farms, and huge beaches lined by palms and forest. Foreign tourists are not plentiful the way they are in other areas of the country, and many of the visitors are Panamanian. The road down to the Sunset Coast from the Pan-American Highway is twisty and has a few potholes to dodge, but every mile takes you further off the beaten track. This area is also popular with surfers. The wide-open beaches take the brunt of the Pacific Ocean rollers, and it’s rare that you’ll need to share a wave. If you want a beach all to yourself, this is the place to come. Find more details at San Blas Adventures.