Paris travel attractions: The Fondation Louis Vuitton’s 11 ultra-sleek galleries opened in the Bois de Boulogne in 2014. Since then, Frank Gehry’s astonishing building has played host to a rotating programme of shows by high-profile modern and contemporary artists. One of the more risque contenders on the Parisian cabaret scene, the art du nu of Le Crazy Horse was pioneered by Alain Bernadin in the 1950s, and still pulls in punters aplenty. It remains dedicated to all things feminine and sexy: lookalike dancers with curious stage names like Enny Gmatic and Hippy Bang Bang all bear the same bodily dimensions. (When standing, the girls’ nipples and hips are all the same height – it’s a requirement.) Expect lots of rainbow-hued light and artfully located strips of black tape. Old-school, self-respecting cabaret.

Paris restaurant pick : Comice : The bulk of Paris’s famed haute cuisine is fiscally out of reach for many. However the year-old Comice, headed by Canadian chef Noam Gedalof and sommelier Etheliya Hananova (the two are married), is an indulgence that won’t completely melt your credit card. The look strikes a similar balance: elegant but relaxed, with striking arrangements from a renowned local florist. Hananova’s wine list — which features lesser-known wines from around the world — is terrific, as is Gedalof’s light, inventive contemporary French cooking. Try the duck foie gras with hazelnuts, strawberries, balsamic, and black pepper or the butter-poached lobster with sweet pea and mascarpone ravioli.

To discover the legendary Paris cafes, the best place to start is the Boulevard Saint-Germain in the 6th arrondissement. This broad tree-lined boulevard is lined with designer fashion boutiques, prestigious cafes, and classic brasseries. The most celebrated cafes are the Cafe de Flore (172 Boulevard Saint-Germain), which was the meeting place of Jean Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, and the Cafe des Deux Magots (6 Place Saint-Germain-des-Pres), the haunt of James Joyce, Picasso, Hemingway, and other creative types. At both cafes, tourists are treated to a classic Parisian cafe experience, complete with waiters wearing bow ties (although the waiters have a reputation for their brusque service). The brasseries of Boulevard Montparnasse were also frequented by famous artists and writers. Le Dome in Montparnasse is a Paris institution (108 Boulevard du Montparnasse). In its glittering Art Deco dining room, the restaurant serves gourmet cuisine focused on seafood. Discover extra details at Paris travel blog 2020.

Paris shopping pick : Grand Magasins on Boulevard Haussmann, Rue Tronchet & La Madeleine Start exploring this shopping area in Paris by strolling around the Place de la Madeleine. The streets surrounding the church—with its stately neoclassical temple design—are lined with trees and elegant shops, cafes and gourmet food shops such as Fauchon. Follow Rue Tronchet from La Madeleine and you’ll head directly toward the huge department stores Printemps and Galeries Lafayette on Boulevard Haussmann (See Department Stores section below for more details). Along the way you’ll pass lots of neat shops. Keep your eyes out for a super handbag and luggage store called La Maroquinerie Parisienne on the right as you approach Boulevard Haussmann. The streets here are lined with shops all along Boulevard Haussmann leading toward the beautiful Opera Garnier. Stop in the huge Monoprix store near Galeries Lafayette for a uniquely Parisian shopping experience. This area is a shopping haven all day long and also after dark when the Opera creates a dramatically beautiful backdrop.

Created between 1755 and 1775 by the architect of King Louis XV, this impressive octagonal square is at the heart of 18th-century Paris. With its majestic dimensions, the Place de la Concorde is one of the most attractive squares in the city. It was the scene of several key historical events, including the execution of King Louis XVI, and it was part of Napoleon’s triumphal route. The square offers sensational views of the triumphal route towards the Arc de Triomphe and the Defense, and towards the Louvre, as well as to the Madeleine and the Palais-Bourbon. At the center is an Egyptian obelisk, which was presented to Charles X by the Viceroy of Egypt. During summer, there is a Ferris wheel here. Explore additional details on FranceTravelBlog.com.